Thanks to Pete Simonson for the suggestion of remembering our radio friends who have passed on.  
We'll include our own articles as well as obituaries. 



F

Nicholas P. "Nick" Farinella Sr.     
Published in Florida Today June 1, 2011
Nicholas P. "Nick" Farinella, Sr., 76, passed away Tuesday, May 31, 2011. He was born in Trenton, N.J. He has been a resident of Cocoa Beach since 1960 when he came here with the Boeing Program. Nick started WXBR -FM 101.1 and was also in the automotive business for twenty years. He had three tennis and sport shops, and then became broker-owner of Century 21-Camelot Realty. He is survived by his wife, Gloria; daughter, Donna and husband, Lou Linden; son, Nick, Jr. and wife, Kevin Hill Farinella; grandson, Garrett Bell; brother, Paul Farinella; and sister, Josephine Farina.
Earl Finckle   
Earl was the "chief meteorologist" on WDBO-AM 580 for many years. 

Earl Finckle, 1927-2009: Charted area weather for years
Wrigley, Comiskey among institutions that relied on Finckle's forecasts
By Robert Mitchum  Chicago Tribune reporter
July 6, 2009
With a homey sense of humor and a talent for forecasting the weather's fickle behavior, Earl Finckle became known throughout Chicago and the country as a reliable radio voice of rain-or-shine predictions. But with his private meteorological firm, Central Weather Service, Mr. Finckle also provided custom weather forecasts for a variety of local businesses and customers: groundskeepers at Wrigley Field and Comiskey Park, pilots planning a flight, cement and roofing workers concerned about rain and farmers tending to their crops. "If your forecasts are accurate, your clients come back," Mr. Finckle told the Tribune in 1991. Mr. Finckle, 81, died of kidney and heart failure Friday, July 3, in Highland Park Hospital, said Sylvia, his wife of 61 years. Mr. Finckle, who was born and raised in Chicago's Humboldt Park neighborhood, fell into his career of weather forecasting almost by accident, his wife said. When he aced an entrance exam upon joining the Air Force, Mr. Finckle told his superiors he was interested in pursuing cryptography. But his mother's Russian citizenship and Cold War politics prevented that career, and he chose the next best thing: meteorology. After training and working for seven years in the meteorology department at Chanute Air Force Base near Rantoul in central Illinois, Mr. Finckle took a compassionate discharge to take care of his teenage siblings when his mother died, his wife said. But his meteorological career continued to bloom, first with private Chicago-area firms like Murray & Trettel, then with his own private forecasting business, Chicago Weather Service. When Mr. Finckle began his company, he rented a small hut without air-conditioning on the grounds of Palwaukee Municipal Airport in Wheeling, where he would calculate forecasts with pencil, paper and a protractor. Starting with a handful of private aviators who used the airport, Mr. Finckle attracted new customers through accurate forecasts and hard work, former co-workers said. "He was a real leader in the area of long-range forecasting. ... His forecasts could be very specific, and many times very dependable." said Wayne Peterson, who worked with Mr. Finckle for nearly 30 years. "It was something special." With radio stations in Chicago and as far away as Orlando and Maryland depending on his forecasts, Mr. Finckle would wake up at 3 a.m. to prepare his predictions and begin calling in forecasts peppered with colorful "Earlisms," his colleagues said. "Earl had a lot of personality," said Mark Rhein, a senior forecaster with Murray & Trettel who trained under and worked with Mr. Finckle. "He was bigger than life, a very professional, very interesting character that had a good sense of humor and a good wit." "The most rewarding part of this job is when you see a forecast come out right," Mr. Finckle told the Tribune in 1991. "Even better, though, is when you were right and everyone else was wrong." Mr. Finckle also is survived by two sons, Larry and Keith; a daughter, Judy; a sister, Lois; and six grandchildren; A brother, Leonard, preceded him in death. A graveside funeral service will be held at 2:30 p.m. Monday at Shalom Memorial Park, 1700 W. Rand Rd., Arlington Heights.
Art Fleming, original Jeopardy' host 
Daily Record 
Morristown, New Jersey
26 Apr 1995
CRYSTAL RIVER, Fla. (AP)
Arthur Fazzin Fleming, the original host of television's "Jeopardy," died at his Florida home yesterday of pancreatic cancer. He was 70. An actor in radio, television, films and theater, Mr. Fleming appeared in numerous TV shows, including "Starsky and Hutch," "Lou Grant" and "Moneychangers." He made 48 movies, including "Primetime," "Airplane H" and "MacArthur." In the latter, he appeared opposite Gregory Peck, playing President Truman's adviser W. Averill Harriman. But he was probably best known for his duties as a television game-show host. He was host of "Jeopardy" when it aired as an NBC daytime show from 1964 to 1975 and during its first year in syndication, 1974-75. He also was host of the show "College Bowl" for seven years. Mr. Fleming, who attended Colgate and Cornell universities, enlisted in the Navy Air Corps the day after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. He spent 312 years as a bomber pilot during World War II. He also was active in civic and religious affairs, and in 1992 he received the Religious Heritage of America's "Faith and Freedom Award." He is survived by his wife, Rebecca, a sister, two children and four grandchildren.
Dr. Frank A. Franco
5/21/1925-2/3/2019
Dr. Frank A. Franco, 93, of Wyomissing, (PA,) passed away on Sunday, February 3, in his home, of natural causes, surrounded by his loving family.  Born May 21, 1925, in Reading, he was the son of the late Thomas G. and Caroline (Droga) Franco.  Dr. Franco graduated from Reading High School in 1942 as a member of the National Honor Society and from Penn State University in 1949, with a B.S. degree and on the Dean's list. He subsequently attended Hahnemann Medical College and received his medical degree in 1953. He completed his post-doctoral training at Jefferson Medical College in internal medicine and practiced for 45 years until his retirement in 1998.  Before graduating from Penn State, Dr. Franco served three years in the U.S. Army in the European Theater during World War II. When the war ended, his unit was assigned to the occupation of Vienna, Austria, where he met his future wife, Paula.  In early 1961, he and a colleague became involved in bringing FM radio to Berks County with the birth of WRFY, later becoming Y-102. (In 1962 he
 became Co-founder of City Broadcasting Co. with Howard F. Reber and they purchased WMMY-FM 95.1 and WMMB-AM 1240).  Radio's success changed his true purpose in life: to help the poor and disadvantaged and to promote Christian education. Dr. Franco had the opportunity to meet many talented people serving on the Board of Directors of all the colleges in the area, and funding the library at Alvernia College and the lab building at Penn State-Berks Campus, in addition to helping fund the auditorium at Berks Catholic High School. He was the recipient of the Alvernia Franciscan and Life Trustee Award, RACC President's Award an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities from Albright College and The Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Dr. Franco's final years were devoted to philanthropic activities, promoting education for the young and disadvantaged. He felt truly blessed to have the opportunity to "do good." Dr. Franco is survived by his son, David P. Franco, husband of Eileen; and his daughter, Mary Jo Roberts, wife of Ruth. He is also survived by three grandchildren: Heather, wife of Darren Haley; Tara, wife of Mark Reynolds; and Rhiannon Andrus; and six great-grandchildren: Addison and Gavin Haley; Alex, Emmeline and Mathew Reynolds; and Mea Cook.  He was predeceased by his wife of 64 years, Paula (Herrmann); and his grandson, David R. Franco.  A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Saturday, February 9, 2019, at 10:30 a.m. at St. Ignatius Loyola R.C. Church, 2810 St. Alban's Drive, Sinking Spring, followed by entombment at Gethsemane Mausoleum. Friends may call Saturday from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the church. In lieu of flowers, Dr. Franco requested contributions be made in his honor to Berks Catholic High School or to Alvernia University.  © Reading Eagle
Tom Franklin    
Pamal Broadcasting's WRZN-AM 720 Hernando-Ocala general manager Tom Franklin passed away Friday May 9, 2008 from an apparent heart attack.
From The Citrus Chronicle  By Mike Wright
To hear his friend Jackie Boring put it, Tom Franklin had a “wonderful mind.” Former Citrus County Commissioner Josh Wooten playfully sparred with Franklin while the two talked politics on TV.  Then Franklin got into the political ring himself, running for county commission against another friend, incumbent Vicki Phillips. All three were in shock Friday after hearing that Franklin died of a heart attack suffered while he and Boring were on their way to dinner. “Citrus County just lost a wonderful mind,” Boring said. “He could have really helped. I used to say his brain was fantastic,  phenomenal and fun. He would find a solution to almost everything. If that solution didn’t work, he’d find another one.”  Boring and Franklin were on their way to the Outback Steakhouse at around 5 p.m. Her car was stopped for the red light at the  intersection of County Roads 491 and 486 when Boring said she noticed Franklin gasping for breath. Another motorist saw the trouble and called 911. Franklin, 60, was rushed to Citrus Memorial Hospital by ambulance, where emergency workers were unable to revive him, Citrus County Sheriff’s Capt. Richard Wesch said. Franklin, who suffered a heart attack in 1999, spent much of last week in the hospital with abdominal pains, Wooten said. He saw Franklin on Wednesday at the Citrus Hills Information Fiesta and again Friday at lunch. “He seemed to be doing really well,” Wooten said. “I spent two hours with him right before this happened. We were having lunch, talking about old times.” Franklin was general manager of WRZN-AM. He held the same position for four years at WYKE-TV, where he and Wooten spent a half-hour each week discussing politics on “We Have Issues.” Franklin also had intense interest in the county’s history and its development. He served on the blue ribbon committee that developed Citrus County’s first comprehensive growth-management plan. In January, Franklin announced his campaign for county commission in the Republican primary against Phillips. County Administrator Anthony Schembri notified Phillips and other commissioners of Franklin’s death. Phillips said she and Franklin were friends. “I’ve known him since he came to this county,” she said. “He’s always been a perfect gentleman and a fine man. I’m just so sad.”
Kevin M. Fennessy    1954-2017
Kevin Fennessy suffered a stroke last Monday and died over the weekend. Kevin was surrounded by family at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, NJ. There will be a Memorial Mass next week in Wildwood, NJ (TBA) for friends and family. Kevin is survived by his wife Joanne and brothers Richard & Ed. During his career in Central Florida Kevin worked at WRZN-AM 720 as General Manager. Kevin was also Vice President/General Manager at WIXC-AM 1060. Fennessy, a veteran broadcaster with management duties at great radio stations, such as WFIL-Philadelphia, WHAM-Rochester and WKBW-Buffalo.  
Joe Francis Passes      6-2-17 
Joe Francis who was with WLOQ-FM 103.1 for over 30 years, and in the business for over 50 years. Joe was with his son and his family in Georgia when he passed.
Tom Franklin    
Pamal Broadcasting's WRZN-AM 720 Hernando-Ocala general manager Tom Franklin passed away Friday May 9, 2008 from an apparent heart attack.
From The Citrus Chronicle  By Mike Wright
To hear his friend Jackie Boring put it, Tom Franklin had a “wonderful mind.” Former Citrus County Commissioner Josh Wooten playfully sparred with Franklin while the two talked politics on TV.  Then Franklin got into the political ring himself, running for county commission against another friend, incumbent Vicki Phillips. All three were in shock Friday after hearing that Franklin died of a heart attack suffered while he and Boring were on their way to dinner. “Citrus County just lost a wonderful mind,” Boring said. “He could have really helped. I used to say his brain was fantastic,  phenomenal and fun. He would find a solution to almost everything. If that solution didn’t work, he’d find another one.”  Boring and Franklin were on their way to the Outback Steakhouse at around 5 p.m. Her car was stopped for the red light at the  intersection of County Roads 491 and 486 when Boring said she noticed Franklin gasping for breath. Another motorist saw the trouble and called 911. Franklin, 60, was rushed to Citrus Memorial Hospital by ambulance, where emergency workers were unable to revive him, Citrus County Sheriff’s Capt. Richard Wesch said. Franklin, who suffered a heart attack in 1999, spent much of last week in the hospital with abdominal pains, Wooten said. He saw Franklin on Wednesday at the Citrus Hills Information Fiesta and again Friday at lunch. “He seemed to be doing really well,” Wooten said. “I spent two hours with him right before this happened. We were having lunch, talking about old times.” Franklin was general manager of WRZN-AM. He held the same position for four years at WYKE-TV, where he and Wooten spent a half-hour each week discussing politics on “We Have Issues.” Franklin also had intense interest in the county’s history and its development. He served on the blue ribbon committee that developed Citrus County’s first comprehensive growth-management plan. In January, Franklin announced his campaign for county commission in the Republican primary against Phillips. County Administrator Anthony Schembri notified Phillips and other commissioners of Franklin’s death. Phillips said she and Franklin were friends. “I’ve known him since he came to this county,” she said. “He’s always been a perfect gentleman and a fine man. I’m just so sad.”
Radio Pioneer Fraser Dies-The Winter Park Resident Was Proud Of A Career Spent As "A Trusted Messenger."
THE ORLANDO SENTINEL
 - Saturday, January 29, 2000 
Author: 
Jim Abbott of The Sentinel Staff 
Although not as well known as Edward R. Murrow, Winter Park resident Gordon Fraser was a pioneer in the early days of radio and television news. Fraser, who died Thursday at 91, was the on-camera announcer when President Franklin D. Roosevelt presided over a historic demonstration of a new curiosity called ``television'' at the 1939 New York World's Fair. In a lengthy radio career that started in 1932, Fraser delivered historic radio accounts of World War II battles and helped launch NBC's Monitor radio program in 1955. That show, a weekend round-the-clock radio program of news and feature reports, was carried by stations around the country. It foreshadowed an era when news would be widely reported through shared resources of radio and television stations. ``He was not a household name, but he contributed to the households of a generation,'' said former Rollins College President Thaddeus Seymour, now a Rollins English professor. "That show was really a very important contribution to journalism in the early days." For 19 years, Fraser was a top writer, producer, editor and correspondent for the program. "My life has been a privilege,'' Fraser said in a 1989 interview. "I've been a messenger. And when you're a trusted messenger, it's a privilege."  Born in Lawrence, Mass., in 1908, Fraser moved to Central Florida in 1974 from Manhasset, N.Y. He began working at Rollins station WPRK-FM 91.5 in 1978, the year Seymour became president. He was drawn to the job because of his enthusiasm for teaching and his love for the medium, Seymour said. "He turned up one day to ask if he could help with the student radio station,'' Seymour said. ``In his most charitable way, he was suggesting that maybe he could help the students pronounce things better. They needed him." Seymour was delighted to realize that, as a 10-year-old boy in 1938, he had been a devoted listener to Fraser's "Five-star Final" radio show on a New York AM station. "It was a show that dramatized the day's events," Seymour said. ``We used to say that we were the only two people in the world who would have remembered it. He wrote it and I listened to it. "You heard Hitler talking to Mussolini or you heard the fireman talking at the scene of a fire,'' Seymour continued. "He was a very, very creative and imaginative person who thought about the medium and the ways that it could be different from newspapers and magazines." At Rollins, Fraser bridged the generation gap to inspire the same enthusiasm in students of another generation. "Time after time I would see a new student come to the radio station and the other students would say, "You've got to listen to this guy. He's old, but he knows everything," said Susan Cohn Lackman, Rollins professor and WPRK-FM 91.5 General Manager. "It was a marvelous thing to see how the students loved him." Fraser is survived by a son, James S., of Tiburon, Calif.; daughters, Faith Sarah Tilton of New York; and Jane Fraser Riffle of Bellevue, Ohio; five grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Carey Hand Garden Chapel Home for Funerals is handling arrangements.  
Copyright 2000 Sentinel Communications Co.


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